Zero Steps Forward, Zero Steps Back

I made another mistake today: I thought ahead. I looked at all the pieces that need to be replaced and all the holes where pieces are missing and felt really discouraged. I started feeling like, is this even possible? Did I bite off more than I can chew? Honestly, I think the answer is maybe I did, but I think the biggest lesson that Betty is teaching me is how to stick with something, even when it’s tough.

So let me back up. One good thing did happen today. I tried to get the last screw out of the cylinder cover and it’s really difficult to access with a standard sized screwdriver (again, stupid design) so I called Brendan in to help me or at least so I could complain to someone. He got in there and played with it and was able to release it, hurray! He’s the best. But of course with every potential step forward with this project, there is always a roadblock. I go to pull the cover off and I cannot for the life of me figure out how to get it off! Brendan was twisting and pulling at it too and we can’t figure out how to maneuver it out from underneath the lip that goes over the engine. (In the picture below you can see the cover lifted up, but it won’t come out). It almost seems like it’s not supposed to come out of there and instead it’s just supposed to twist out of the way? But that still makes it really difficult to access the cylinder head, which is ultimately what I’m trying to get at so I can replace a gasket. Very frustrating/discouraging. Eventually I just decided to walk away because no good work ever gets done when you’re feeling defeated (plus I was really hungry and no good work gets done when you’re hungry either).

So I guess the next step is to figure out how to get the cylinder head off. Also I plan on ordering a gasket (with the hopes that I will be able to replace it one day) and a flywheel holder tool so that I can remove the flywheel and decide if I need to replace the magneto under it.

And that’s it. I think I need to remember to take one step at a time and don’t look up from the task I’m working on. Overall this is a massive project that is giving me a problem every tiny step of the way, but if I can keep my head down and do one thing at a time, maybe I can get somewhere. Or maybe not. But the point of all this was to learn a few things and I am definitely learning. Most importantly I’m learning not to give up and how to approach a large, daunting problem without getting overwhelmed. I’ve been having these grand dreams of riding Betty around town and maybe instead I need to start dreaming about the smaller tasks, like replacing a gasket or just getting a spark.

Words of encouragement are appreciated, or even a reality check if needed (eg. “Kaitlin this is not gonna happen, it’s probably best you give up now”). Anyway, hopefully I’ll have something more interesting to report back soon. Ps. We were watching this dog, Keara, this weekend who is awesome and was hanging out with me today. She makes for a great shop dog.

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3 thoughts on “Zero Steps Forward, Zero Steps Back”

  1. Perhaps I should start with the first word of your first blog entry and read to be sure you haven’t already answered this, but:
    I just looked online, there are several repair manuals available, is that an option for you or are you deconstructing and restoring by doing as part of the project?

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    1. I have the Haynes manual and a restoration book (of a different model Vespa) that I’ve looked over, but perhaps could look at more thoroughly. It seems that a lot of my problems are coming from not being able to access things or nuts and bolts being so stuck on there just from age.

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  2. Many manuals will have exploded-view diagrams which are extremely helpful to identify order of disassembly and reassembly. I always remind myself the people made it and that means I can take it apart, repair it and reassemble it. Try P B Blaster penetrating oil spray for fasteners rusted in place. Also effective: heat from a propane torch, cold as in ice, vibration, hammering the bit while on the fastener while also torquing and a combination of all of these.
    There are some good general mechanics videos on YouTube, and I expect more every day.

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